Diabetic Foot Treatment: Non-Surgical Options to Treat and Prevent Diabetic Foot Ulcers

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Those with poorly controlled blood sugar levels frequently develop open lesions on their feet, sometimes known as diabetic foot ulcers, which is a common diabetic foot diagnosis. In reality, 15% of diabetics will get a foot ulcer, and 1 in 5 of those people could need to stay in the hospital.

Two of the most common disease processes that have an impact on a patient’s feet when they have diabetes are peripheral arterial disease and diabetic peripheral sensory neuropathy.

Peripheral arterial disease describes damage to the medium and small arteries, which carry blood and oxygen to the tissue in the foot.

image 3 Dr Gaurav Gangwani

What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer?

A diabetic foot ulcer is a type of wound that occurs on the foot or lower leg of individuals with diabetes. It is caused by a combination of factors, including poor circulation, nerve damage (neuropathy), and poor wound healing.

Diabetes can damage the nerves in the feet and legs, reducing sensation and making it difficult to detect injuries such as cuts or blisters. Additionally, diabetes can cause damage to the blood vessels, reducing blood flow to the feet and legs and making it more difficult for wounds to heal.

If left untreated, diabetic foot ulcers can become infected and lead to serious complications such as cellulitis (infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue), osteomyelitis (infection of the bone), and gangrene (tissue death). These complications can lead to amputation of the affected limb and even death in severe cases.

Early detection and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers are critical to prevent complications and improve outcomes.

How Foot Ulcers Develop in Individuals with Diabetes

Foot ulcers in individuals with diabetes develop due to a combination of factors, including poor circulation, nerve damage (neuropathy), and poor wound healing.

  • When a person with diabetes has poor circulation, it means that blood flow to the feet and legs is reduced. This can be caused by damage to the blood vessels due to high blood sugar levels over time. Poor circulation makes it harder for the body to deliver oxygen and nutrients to the tissues in the feet and legs, which can slow down the healing process.

  • Nerve damage, or neuropathy, is another factor that can contribute to foot ulcers. When the nerves in the feet and legs are damaged, a person may not be able to feel when they have injured their foot or developed a blister or sore. This can lead to further injury and damage, as they may continue to walk on the affected foot without realizing that there is a problem.

  • Poor wound healing is also common in individuals with diabetes. This can be due to a number of factors, including high blood sugar levels, poor circulation, and infection. When a person with diabetes develops a foot ulcer, the wound may take longer to heal than it would in someone without diabetes, increasing the risk of complications.

Overall, a combination of poor circulation, nerve damage, and poor wound healing can contribute to the development of foot ulcers in individuals with diabetes. It is important to monitor the feet regularly and seek proper diabetic foot ulcer care if any injuries or abnormalities are detected.

Peripheral Angioplasty and Preventive Measures: Non-Surgical Options to Treat and Prevent Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Diabetic foot ulcers can be a debilitating complication for individuals with diabetes, leading to pain, infection, and in severe cases, amputation. However, with proper care and management, foot ulcers can be prevented and treated without resorting to surgery. Peripheral angioplasty is one such non-surgical option that can help improve circulation and prevent the development of foot ulcers in individuals with diabetes.

Peripheral angioplasty

Peripheral angioplasty involves the insertion of a thin, flexible tube (catheter) into a blocked or narrowed blood vessel in the leg or foot. Once the catheter is in place, a small balloon is inflated to widen the vessel and improve blood flow. In some cases, a stent may be placed to help keep the vessel open. Peripheral angioplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that can be performed on an outpatient basis, with most patients able to return home the same day.

In addition to peripheral angioplasty, there are several other non-surgical options that can be effective in preventing diabetic foot ulcers. 

Prevention

Regular foot examinations by a healthcare provider can help detect any abnormalities or injuries early on, while proper foot care, such as keeping the feet clean and moisturized and avoiding walking barefoot, can help prevent skin breakdown and infection. Wearing properly fitting shoes and socks and using custom orthotics or shoe inserts can also help prevent foot ulcers from developing.

It is also important for individuals with diabetes to control their blood sugar levels, as high blood sugar can contribute to poor circulation and slow wound healing. Following a healthy diet, engaging in regular physical activity, and taking medications as prescribed can all help manage blood sugar levels. 

Conclusion

Diabetic foot ulcers are a serious complication for individuals with diabetes that can lead to severe complications and even amputation if left untreated. However, with proper care and treatment of diabetic foot in Mumbai, foot ulcers can be prevented and treated without the need for surgery. Peripheral angioplasty is one such non-surgical option that can help improve circulation and prevent the development of foot ulcers.

Additionally, regular foot examinations, proper foot care, and controlling blood sugar levels are important preventive measures that individuals with diabetes can take to reduce the risk of developing foot ulcers. Early detection and treatment of foot ulcers are critical to prevent complications and improve outcomes for those with diabetes. By staying informed and taking proactive steps to manage their condition, individuals with diabetes can help prevent the development of diabetic foot ulcers and maintain good foot health.

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